Editing · Formatting · Writing

Writing Mistakes at the Sentence Level

I’ve noticed lately that I comment on a lot of the same issues when doing line edits, so I decided to make a short list of the common issues I spot while editing or reading. The issues below are tips to keep in mind when you tackle line edits. They are issues I spot and bring up with clients all the time and even sometimes spot them slipping past edits in published books. Keeping an eye out for the below will help strengthen your sentences.

Shaking Versus Nodding: When a character shakes their head, it means no. Nodding means yes. Too often characters shake heads to mean yes or nod no and it confuses the reader.

Repetitive Wording: If a character nods, it’s assumed they are nodding their head because what else are they going to nod? Same with shrugging. Stick to a concise nod or shrug instead of the longer and more repetitive, “She nodded her head.” Continue reading “Writing Mistakes at the Sentence Level”

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Reading · Reviews

Book Review: Into the Drowning Deep

Time to gush about one of my favorite reads of the year! Into the Drowning Deep is by Mira Grant, who also goes by Seanan McGuire. This book is about mermaids, and not the beautiful Disney type. Of course this book gets 5 stars from me and I’m crossing my fingers that there are more books coming in the series because I absolutely need more of this world.

Seven years ago, the Atargatis set off on a voyage to the Mariana Trench to film a “mockumentary”about mermaids. It was lost at sea with all hands. Many believe the incident to be a hoax. A new crew sets out to prove that the seven-year-old hoax about mermaids isn’t a hoax at all. Not all the crew are believers, but soon enough they are all faced with creatures of the deep whose discovery will come at a high price. Continue reading “Book Review: Into the Drowning Deep”

Reading · Reviews

Book Review: Reincarnation Blues

I’ve always loved stories dealing with reincarnation. There’s something romantic about the idea of living multiple lives and becoming a better person through each experience. Add a love story to the mix and I couldn’t say no to reading Reincarnation Blues by Michael Poore. This book had such a unique take on reincarnation and I adored the love story. I give the book 4 stars out of 5 and recommend this to anyone looking for a good reincarnation tale.

The story is about Milo, a man who has lived almost 10,000 lives in a world where you get 10,000 lives to reach Perfection and become part of the oversoul to be at one with the universe. Milo has fallen in love with Suzie, the incarnation of Death. He doesn’t want to reach Perfection, he just wants to be with Suzie. But if Milo doesn’t reach Perfection in time, his soul will be destroyed. Continue reading “Book Review: Reincarnation Blues”

Uncategorized

Remote Publishing Internships

Breaking into publishing is difficult enough even if you are located in NYC. Unfortunately for those of us not in NYC, open positions are limited and difficult to find. Below you will find a list of places who accept remote interns. If you are looking for a position I recommend checking the job board on Publishers Marketplace, Media Bistro, and bookjobs.com for new positions. Some agents will post on Twitter when they are looking for an intern.

If you know of any house or agency who accepts remote interns and are not already included below, please let me know so they can be added to the list. Continue reading “Remote Publishing Internships”

Reading · Reviews · Uncategorized

Book Review: The Silent Companions

One of my recent reads was a spooky Victorian gothic set in a crumbling English estate in the countryside. I enjoy horror and creepy stories and I have a tendency to gravitate toward ones with historical settings. The Silent Companions by Laura Purcell did not disappoint. I give it 4 stars and if you are looking for a good creepy gothic, add this to your list right away. If you are like me and find stories about anything doll-like horrifying then don’t read this one right before bed.

So what’s it about? Elsie has recently married into the Bainbridge family. Her husband’s family is marked by tragedy, including the death of countless Bainbridge heirs, but Elsie has also suffered from the gruesome loss of her father in the family’s matchstick factory. Elsie’s happy marriage comes to a screeching halt when her husband suddenly dies, leaving her as the owner of the Bainbridge estate known as the Bridge. The estate is full of eerie lifelike wooden dolls. Elsie is unnerved when she discovers one that looks just like her as a child. Her fears intensify when the dolls begin to multiply, first taking on the visages of past inhabitants and then tragic figures from her own background. Then the grisly bodies of the Bridge’s inhabitants begin to stack up. What at first seems to be a dark power haunting the manor could just as easily be Elsie’s runaway imagination bringing her fears to life. Purcell masterfully toes the line between these possibilities as she tells the story behind the lurking evil through Elsie’s experiences at the Bridge, her time spent in a psychiatric hospital after her stay, and through the 17th-century diary revealing the origin of the dolls. Continue reading “Book Review: The Silent Companions”

history · Reading · Reviews

Book Review: Carnegie’s Maid

I couldn’t pass up a book that takes place in 1860’s industrial Pittsburgh, let alone one about Carnegie. You might recognize the author Marie Benedict from her last book, The Other Einstein. I give Carnegie’s Maid 3.5 stars. While I enjoyed the idea of the story, the world-building and character development fell too flat for me. The climax was also underwhelming. One thing this book did get right is detailing the struggle of Irish immigrants in America. That aspect was the most believable for me in this historical.

As the title suggests, Carnegie’s Maid follows the story of Clara Kelly, an Irish immigrant who heads to America to find employment. When a girl with the same name as her dies on the boat, Clara assumes the other girl’s identity to take her job in Pittsburgh as a lady’s maid. Clara uses her salary to help her struggling family in Ireland. However, her new position becomes tricky when a blossoming romance begins between Clara and Andrew Carnegie. Due to their difference in status, a successful marriage between them is unlikely. When Carnegie’s mother gets wind of Clara’s fake identity, she threatens to tell Andrew. Knowing a happy future together is futile, Clara leaves to pursue a life elsewhere, using her salary to pay for her family’s tickets to America. The story is a great peek into the rise of the Carnegie steel empire, how Carnegie’s success affected poor immigrants, and his sudden rise as a philanthropist. Continue reading “Book Review: Carnegie’s Maid”

Reading

The Never-Ending Reading List

I feel like this is something every reader experiences at some point. You get busy with life and other hobbies and before you know it your planned reading list is growing out of control and books are piling up. The best thing about switching to ebooks was that it made it easier to contain all those piles. I read a lot, but I still experience an uncontrollable reading list way too often because I’m addicted to looking for new books. I finally had to stop and realize I will probably always feel behind on my reading no matter how many books I get through I always feel hopelessly behind. I’m working on enjoying the journey and not rushing to the finish line. Continue reading “The Never-Ending Reading List”