Life as a Royal Mistress

If you have any interest in learning more about the lives of royal mistresses, then you must read “Sex with Kings: 500 Years of Adultery, Power, Rivalry, and Revenge” by Eleanor Herman. She also has a book called “Sex with the Queen: 900 Years of Vile Kings, Virile Lovers, and Passionate Politics” for those who want to know more about the lovers Queens took. I found this book so fascinating that I plan to eventually read “Sex with the Queen” as well. I read this book over a few sessions to give myself time to absorb all the information. This book is well written without the dry, stuffy text that some non-fiction books suffer from.

Sex With Kings

The only historical royal mistress I could name before reading this book was Anne Boleyn, who is in fact mentioned in the book. This book taught me everything I hoped to learn and then some. It focuses on a handful of mistresses, like Madame de Pompadour who was the official chief mistress of Louis XV from 1745 to 1751. However, Lesser known mistresses are also mentioned, including a few that last a year or less along with what we know about them. But a few like Madame Pompadour are repeatedly mentioned throughout, so they are the ones that stuck with me due to how much information was known about them and how fascinating their lives and the end of their reign as mistress was. Continue reading

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How the Irish Saved Civilization

To start off my reading challenge, I started with “How the Irish Saved Civilization” by Thomas Cahill. My goal was to learn more about Irish history, and this book most definitely helped me accomplish that. Next time I’d like to focus on ancient Ireland and the Celts, but this book taught me a lot about Ireland leading up to the Medieval era after the fall of Rome. After reading, I’d recommend this book to anyone interested in the topic.

How_the_Irish_Saved_Civilization Continue reading

My Reading Challenge

I’m starting a new reading challenge next week. For those who follow me on Twitter, you know I like to write. For those who also write and are trying to get published, you know how hard and draining the process can be. Sometimes you just need to take a break and regroup. For those who work in publishing, you likely understand how hard it can be to find time to read outside of your workload. While I’m between writing projects, I decided to make a dent in my library wishlist. At this point it has something like 70 books on it and it grows every month.

One of the best ways to improve your writing outside of well, actually writing, is reading. Since I work as an editor and literary assistant, I try to read widely to get a handle on what’s hot, what’s been overdone, and what I wish would be written. I’ve also been working hard at trying to improve my own writing. As such, I’m planning to read 1-3 books a week for a minimum of a month across multiple genres outside of my work hours, which alone include at least two unpublished books a week. I like to write fantasy and historical, so there will be a lot of that included. I plan to include adult, young adult, and some historical non-fiction. Continue reading