Publishing Q&A and Editing Giveaway

It’s come to my attention that there has been an issue with the questions. Leave your question on the blog the normal way to make sure I see it.

Ever have a question about getting an internship in publishing, the difference between editing and agenting internships, what to consider before hiring a freelance editor, or what literary assistants do? Now is your chance to ask! I’ll be fielding questions to answer on my blog. I can’t promise I will answer them all but I will answer as many as I can. I have experience as an editing intern, an agency intern, as a freelance editor, and as a literary assistant. Keep in mind I’m not taking my own agenting clients yet, so I’m not the best person to ask about contracts or other similar topics. However, I do have slush experience.

Combined with this Q&A I will be giving away three first chapter edit letters. The giveaway ends Friday at midnight and winners will be announced by Sunday on the blog and Twitter. I will contact the winners. If I get no response in three days I will pick a new winner.

If you plan to enter and ask a question, you can do both via the rafflecopter link below. If you don’t want to enter, feel free to still ask a question in the comments. I’ll post answers when I announce the winners.

You’ll notice in the entry option there is an option to share your favorite inspirational writing quote. I added that as an option for two reasons. 1. I like inspirational quotes. 2. I’d like to share some of my favorites that are submitted.

Enter at the link below.

First Chapter Edit Letter Giveaway.

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Anne Boleyn in Fiction

Anne Boleyn is a popular figure in Tudor historical fiction and it’s easy to see why with all the drama surrounding her. Anne’s story began as a love story for the ages only to end with her tragic execution. Anne was the commoner who seduced King Henry VIII, a king willing to break from the Catholic Church to have her. More than that, she ended up being the first queen arrested and executed in Britain, a dark ending for a queen who chose “The Most Happy” as her motto.

Anne Boleyn.jpg

Anne was the second of King Henry’s six wives. Before her came Queen Katherine of Aragon who never provided the king with an heir, a huge failure for a king who needed to ensure the safety of his line. By the time Anne appeared at court, it was clear there would be no heir from Katherine. At first Henry only wanted Anne as his mistress, but she hailed from a cunning line and in the true fashion of her family, used Henry’s desire for her and an heir to become queen. Anne and Katherine became rivals for the throne and Katherine held tight to her position as queen even after Henry banished her from court. Since the Catholic Church refused to grant Henry a divorce so he could marry Anne, he broke away from the Catholic Church and made himself the Supreme Head of the Church of England. Continue reading

Flight of the Sparrow – Historical Review

Over the weekend I read a historical that I got sucked into and couldn’t put down. Flight of the Sparrow is by Amy Belding Brown and I give it four stars out of five.

Flight of the Sparrow

Massachusetts Bay Colony, 1676. Even before Mary Rowlandson was captured by Indians on a winter day of violence and terror, she sometimes found herself in conflict with her rigid Puritan community. Now, her home destroyed, her children lost to her, she has been sold into the service of a powerful woman tribal leader, made a pawn in the ongoing bloody struggle between English settlers and native people. Battling cold, hunger, and exhaustion, Mary witnesses harrowing brutality but also unexpected kindness. To her confused surprise, she is drawn to her captors’ open and straightforward way of life, a feeling further complicated by her attraction to a generous, protective English-speaking native known as James Printer. All her life, Mary has been taught to fear God, submit to her husband, and abhor Indians. Now, having lived on the other side of the forest, she begins to question the edicts that have guided her, torn between the life she knew and the wisdom the natives have shown her.

Based on the compelling true narrative of Mary Rowlandson, Flight of the Sparrow is an evocative tale that transports the reader to a little-known time in early America and explores the real meanings of freedom, faith, and acceptance.

Continue reading

Subjectivity in Publishing

Subjectivity can be so frustrating for querying authors and those on submission to houses. When you are trying to get an agent you will get tired of hearing about how subjective the industry is but it is so true. Subjectivity is real and not some myth created to frustrate or console rejected writers. As frustrating as it can be for those trying to get published, subjectivity is what lands all the varying books out there on shelves for readers.

What is subjectivity? You know how some people prefer chocolate ice cream but those who are wrong prefer vanilla or strawberry? That is subjectivity. What one person might prefer another disagrees with. In publishing subjectivity is why some of us prefer specific genres or third person point of view over first person or vice versa. You know how a friend or family member recommended that one book to you that everyone was raving about? Yet when you read it you didn’t much care for it? That’s subjectivity in the industry. For me the most recent book that happened with was A Darker Shade of Magic. But subjectivity is why we get so many different types of books and writing on shelves. If not for subjectivity our reading options would be narrower. I’ve seen several books written in verse lately, but that sort of writing doesn’t appeal to me but it does appeal to others, so we can thank subjectivity for the variety of books it gives us. As they say variety is the spice of life. Continue reading