Reading · Reviews

Book Review: Ivory and Bone

Ivory and Bone is a young adult novel set during the Ice Age. It’s the first of a series with the next book in the series, Obsidian and Stars, already out. Overall I give this book 4 stars out of 5. I’ve been craving books set during the Ice Age and I wish there were more of them, but I admit I had a few hangups with this book while reading. However I still look forward to reading Obsidian and Stars.

Ivory and Bone is about a teenager named Kol who is searching for a bride while finding his clan caught up in a war between two other clans. First off this book does a great job of bringing to light some of the struggles teenagers during the Ice Age would have dealt with, like the main character Kol searching for a bride amongst other clans because there aren’t enough girls in his clan. This book also tackles the issue of the number of mammoths dwindling, making survival a struggle for those who relied on them. The setting of this book is what made the story was the books biggest strength in my opinion. Continue reading “Book Review: Ivory and Bone”

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Reading · Reviews

Book Review: The Last Namsara

The Last Namsara by Kristen Ciccarelli was a book that originally wasn’t high on my reading list, but I ran into it at the library and picked it up and I’m so glad I did. I give this book 5 stars. The little stories included in it were beautiful and I was hooked for the whole ride. As an editor I see a lot of authors struggle with world building, but this book is a great of example of how to do world building gradually without overwhelming readers. The world building was fantastic and one of my favorite aspects of this book.

32667458In the beginning, there was the Namsara: the child of sky and spirit, who carried love and laughter wherever he went. But where there is light, there must be darkness—and so there was also the Iskari. The child of blood and moonlight. The destroyer. The death-bringer.

These are the legends that Asha, daughter of the king of Firgaard, has grown up learning in hushed whispers, drawn to the forbidden figures of the past. But it isn’t until she becomes the fiercest, most feared dragon slayer in the land that she takes on the role of the next Iskari—a lonely destiny that leaves her feeling more like a weapon than a girl.

Asha conquers each dragon and brings its head to the king, but no kill can free her from the shackles that await at home: her betrothal to the cruel commandant, a man who holds the truth about her nature in his palm. When she’s offered the chance to gain her freedom in exchange for the life of the most powerful dragon in Firgaard, she finds that there may be more truth to the ancient stories than she ever could have expected. With the help of a secret friend—a slave boy from her betrothed’s household—Asha must shed the layers of her Iskari bondage and open her heart to love, light, and a truth that has been kept from her. Continue reading “Book Review: The Last Namsara”

Reading · Reviews

Book Review: An Enchantment of Ravens

I recently read An Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret Rogerson and fell in love with the story. I admit I love books dealing with the fae, I always have. As a child I was fascinated with elves and fairies. However having them in a book isn’t guaranteed to make me like it. I found the world of the fae in this book charming albeit tragic. This is one of those books that will definitely stick with me for a while. This book gets 5 stars from me and it’s one I would recommend to fantasy lovers who are looking for stories dealing with the fae from a human perspective.

30969741A skilled painter must stand up to the ancient power of the faerie courts—even as she falls in love with a faerie prince—in this gorgeous debut novel.

Isobel is a prodigy portrait artist with a dangerous set of clients: the sinister fair folk, immortal creatures who cannot bake bread, weave cloth, or put a pen to paper without crumbling to dust. They crave human Craft with a terrible thirst, and Isobel’s paintings are highly prized. But when she receives her first royal patron—Rook, the autumn prince—she makes a terrible mistake. She paints mortal sorrow in his eyes—a weakness that could cost him his life.

Furious and devastated, Rook spirits her away to the autumnlands to stand trial for her crime. Waylaid by the Wild Hunt’s ghostly hounds, the tainted influence of the Alder King, and hideous monsters risen from barrow mounds, Isobel and Rook depend on one another for survival. Their alliance blossoms into trust, then love—and that love violates the fair folks’ ruthless laws. Now both of their lives are forfeit, unless Isobel can use her skill as an artist to fight the fairy courts. Because secretly, her Craft represents a threat the fair folk have never faced in all the millennia of their unchanging lives: for the first time, her portraits have the power to make them feel. Continue reading “Book Review: An Enchantment of Ravens”

Reading · Reviews

Why I Quit Reading a Book

Once upon a time I insisted on finishing every book I started. Mostly because as a kid ebooks weren’t a thing yet and I didn’t want to waste the money spent on books. I also only got a handful of new books a year so I wanted to savor them all. These days I’m more likely to put down a book I’m not enjoying before finishing it. When I can’t get into a book I’d been eager to read, it leaves me with the predicament of when to quit reading. I do a lot of my reading via the library now, and when I buy books I try to read the first chapter before I do.

It took quitting a few books before the guilt of not finishing finally left me alone. Sometimes I want to know how the story ends, but I’m not enjoying the journey. In that case once it feels like a slog for more than one chapter I just look up the book to see how it ends. More recently while reading Hunted I decided to quit as soon as I began to feel bored. The truth is I have so many books on my reading list that I don’t want to waste my time on something I’m not feeling when there are so many other books calling my name. These days my to-be-read list grows faster than I can read. I give every book at least three chapters to catch my attention. A few get put down just from scanning the first chapter, while I make it farther in others before quitting. Continue reading “Why I Quit Reading a Book”

Reading · Reviews

Book Reviews and Subjectivity: The Selection Review

I’ve posted about subjectivity before and while it can determine what books we like to read and write, it can also play into how we review books. I found myself thinking about this recently after I read and reviewed The Selection by Kiera Cass. When I reviewed it the average rating on Goodreads was 4.15 stars. I rated it 3 and the more I think about it, according to my tastes it’d be more of a 2.5. However the series is a bestseller and there are a ton of reviews gushing about the series. However, it wasn’t to my tastes. I can see why the story did so well, but I found too many aspects about the writing and book itself weak. This book is a great example of subjectivity since while I, one reader, found the book to be lacking, the book still became a popular series.

The Selection is basically The Bachelor for teens. Let’s take a moment to review the blurb and cover for it. One thing this book does have going for it is a gorgeous cover.

10507293For thirty-five girls, the Selection is the chance of a lifetime. The opportunity to escape the life laid out for them since birth. To be swept up in a world of glittering gowns and priceless jewels. To live in a palace and compete for the heart of gorgeous Prince Maxon.

But for America Singer, being Selected is a nightmare. It means turning her back on her secret love with Aspen, who is a caste below her. Leaving her home to enter a fierce competition for a crown she doesn’t want. Living in a palace that is constantly threatened by violent rebel attacks.

Then America meets Prince Maxon. Gradually, she starts to question all the plans she’s made for herself—and realizes that the life she’s always dreamed of may not compare to a future she never imagined. Continue reading “Book Reviews and Subjectivity: The Selection Review”